Which is correct: "of course" or "ofcourse"? - English Language ...

Which is correct: "of course" or "ofcourse"? - English Language ... - pagine correlate

I'm not sure what novels you are referring to, but ofcourse is a typo. Wiktionary doesn't have an entry for it, and neither does Merriam-Webster or any dictionary I ...

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13 Aug 2013 ... Right can be used more often than correct. Correct implies something is absolutely true. Right can be used in matters of opinion. edit for ...

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It's certainly true that "if yes" is a lot less common than "if so". But it's not so much that it's wrong, as that it implies things a bit differently and is therefore rarer.

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20 Sep 2015 ... This is an example of hypercorrection, which is when native speakers make an accidental error in their zeal to avoid a different error. In this case, the error that's ...

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"These two" is correct because two is a plural, as you say. The only sensible exception I can come up with is in a very specific verbal discussion. A signwriter is ...

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For most verbs, we form the simple past and the past participle by adding -ed to the verb, for example kick - kicked - kicked. Stick is irregular: the simple past and ...

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2 Nov 2016 ... Hurt means "causing oneself/experiencing pain" with no object. When used with personal pronouns as subjects it means "something ...

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28 Aug 2018 ... Using "kindly" as an adjective, rather than an adverb, is correct but may be considered old-fashioned by some. A kindly action is one which is ...

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14 Jul 2017 ... "All" what? A more natural expression is. Thanks for all you've done for us. or. Thanks for all your help. But it could just be something the kids ...

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There are many dialects in English. In some dialects, "you was..." is used. Here is an example, the song "You was right, baby." (YouTube). Lyrics: you said ...

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I reject your premise that the word year starts with a phonetic sound of e. Here's how it is pronounced according to the various dictionaries: Wiktionary: (RP) IPA: ...

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'Pidgeon' is both slang and a word: BLUE PIDGEON FLIERS, thieves who steal lead off houses and churches, (cant). MILK THE PIDGEON, to endeavour at ...

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The usage stats from the British National Corpus (BNC) look as follows: ALL SPOKEN FICTION MAGAZINE NEWSPAPER ACADEMIC NON-ACAD MISC ...

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30 Jul 2012 ... I have not seen the word "instable" being used often. The word "instability" exists, though. Funnily, the word "unstability" does not exist.

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From Wikipedia. The romanization of Japanese is the application of the Latin script to write the Japanese language. This method of writing is sometimes referred ...

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11 Dec 2014 ... No worries is an expression seen in Australian/British/New Zealand-English meaning "do not worry about that". that's all right; sure thing.

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29 Apr 2014 ... oxforddictionaries.com states that: Adjectives make their comparative and superlative forms in different ways, depending on the base adjective ...

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Could you help me to understand what "doodle let me go" and "yaller girls" phrases mean? share. Share a link to this question. Copy link. CC BY-SA 4.0.

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This is not an infinitive. "Hearing from you soon" is a gerund, which functions as a noun. I look forward to [hearing from you soon]. is the same kind of construction ...

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4 Jun 2016 ... If an activity is a process or takes a long duration of time, expressing it with continuous tenses seems natural. I will be coming tomorrow. The act ...

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As a native American English speaker, I don't know if there is much of a difference. At the very least, no one has ever taken me to task for using either one with ...

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22 Oct 2012 ... The following is from my own (and, I trust, a general British) perspective. This one would be very difficult to provide supporting references for.

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They're both grammatically and semantically correct. They differ in style and register. "..ghettos, such as the ones found..." is verbose: two words versus "..ghettos ...

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Both As did I and So did I are grammatically correct. As did I is very formal and may sound awkward in informal conversations. Another more informal way of ...

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With "of": have need of: This is very formal usage, though, as simply using "need" would suffice. They had need of shelter. in need of: This is more commonly ...

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The first question is more inquisitive and could be rephrased to be: "Please explain why it is like that." The second question is of a slightly more confronting ...

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22 Jan 2015 ... Suino is the most formal, scientific, commercial term, and also more generic (boars are suini, even not being maiali). Maiale is the most neutral ...

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23 Oct 2015 ... As noted, advice is uncountable so it takes no plural form. In the following extract from "Oxford dictionaries", however, they hint at a ...

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20 Dec 2016 ... "..the both parties.." is incorrect. Here, both has already qualified parties and is clear what/who is being referred to. Nevertheless, people use it ...

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I see a subtle difference, which might be more obvious to anyone into Systems Thinking or NLP. The first has a more passive meaning, in that it implies that a ...

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In the context of your question, "all this" means many things taken as a single whole. "All these" means many things as part of the whole; not everything.

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1 Jul 2018 ... According to Google Books Ngram Viewer, both expressions are used, but from A to B is more common. You can talk about going between two ...

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It depends on the question we are answering. Number 1 would be correct in the usual case, when someone asks, "Where are you from?" In that case, we would ...

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"As follows" would be the more appropriate usage. An alternative would be "The reasons for these decisions are:" or "The operator is defined by:".

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When "who" is the object of the preposition, as in this case, it becomes "whom"; granted, this is by now vestigial and often ignored in informal conversation. You'll ...

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@JLG: Why would you say is yet doesn't make sense? Looks like Abraham Lincoln was not a native speaker:) "The hour is yet to come, yes nigh at hand" ...

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15 Aug 2013 ... Since "would" is subjunctive (http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/subjunctive[2]), it does sound more polite, while "will" comes off as a bit ...

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In the meantime means until something expected happens, or while something else is happening: Your computer won't arrive till Thursday. In the meantime, you ...

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19 Aug 2015 ... On average, the polyunsaturated fat content in one teaspoon of olive oil and one teaspoon of canola oil is the same. On average, the ...

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5 Feb 2012 ... I think not! In British English, I don't think so. and I think not. are both used, although they have different nuances. I don't think so. is more ...

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The addition of the "or not" is neither logically nor grammatically required. I think it's often used conversationally for emphasis. I definitely wouldn't use it in writing ...

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16 Jun 2019 ... "Nonetheless" was once commonly written as "none the less." However, that that is no longer the case is indicated by the Online Etymology ...

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Take a look at this very similar question here on EL&U. Quoting the relevant answer from here-. In terms of meaning, there is no difference between these ...

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You can certainly ask Whom are you hanging out with?— it's completely grammatical— though the kind of person who would say it would probably use the even ...

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A: John doesn't smoke. B: Neither do I C: Nor do I D: I don't either. E: Me neither. They're all correct, E is "nonstandard English", I wouldn't recommend writing it ...

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The only right way to say it is: bonne chance. You got that false answer with bon chance because your corpus is set to English. If you set it to French, you will get ...

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3 set 2019 ... Ci saremo chiesti almeno una volta nella vita il significato del nome di alcune ... Che cosa significa "Bayern" nel nome di una squadra?

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9 Jun 2018 ... Your understanding of the two phrases is correct and that is the usual explanation for using one over the other.

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There's a very subtle difference. People on its own suggests that those in the list are there by chance. The people, on the other hand, suggests they been ...

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I would think that "a year ago" is the phrase normally used. Looking at the data reported by the Corpus of Contemporary American, I can create the following ...

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30 Apr 2017 ... There is no “correct way to react," although there are some things you could say that sound more natural than others. You could use a one-word ...

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13 Jun 2012 ... "In work" means I have a job. I might not be there currently, but I have employment. "At work" means I am currently doing my job, or at least on ...

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20 Apr 2018 ... It depends if you are "referring" to the opinion of: ONE or MORE persons(subjects). Explanation: I have listened to (her; singular) point of view.

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27 Mar 2019 ... Think of "in here" as a more specific version of "here". In many cases you can substitute "here" for "in here", without really losing any meaning.

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16 Oct 2018 ... "few" is used with a countable noun: "There are too few apples in the box". This is equivalent to "not enough apples". "Water" is not countable, ...

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The correct phrase is "Once in a while", as two separate words. As "awhile" is an adverb, it wouldn't make sense to say "Once in awhile". See @V0ight's ...

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8 Jan 2015 ... Meaning from Merriam-Webster -. As for -. (meaning) with regard to/concerning. Example -. He's here. As for the others, they'll arrive later.

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Do from is an 'Indianism', so use of this phrase must be referred to speakers of that dialect. In Standard English† we use at with the verb do; the preposition ...

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25 Sep 2014 ... It is generally called the silent e rule: Suffix addition: dropping silent e. The silent e rule is more consistent than the doubling rule. The principle: ...

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